Larry James' CelebrateIntimateWeddings BLOG

Friday, March 13, 2015

The Wedding Invitation game

Filed under: Etiquette,Invitations,Wedding Tips — Larry James @ 7:30 am
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Before sending your invitation proofs to be printed, review the following and avoid any possible mistakes.

Check, double check, and have someone else look over the wording on the invitation. This includes assuring that spelling of names and reception and ceremony locations are correct, as well as the date and time.

WEDInvitationGAMEForget the gifts. Avoid including any information regarding gift registries, or even the suggestion of a “No gifts, please.” The purpose of the invitation is to focus on inviting the individual, not implying that a gift is necessary. To spread information about registries, include the information on your wedding website or ask family members to spread the word.

Instead of writing “Adults Only,” or “No Children,” only write the names of the parents on the outer and inner envelope (if you are using one).

Information about attire is never added to the invitation to the ceremony unless the ceremony and reception invitations are combined. If the reception is more formal, say black tie, include that on the bottom right corner of the reception invitation.

Menu choices, such as chicken or vegetarian, may be listed on the reply card, but don’t reference alcohol services.

Plan ahead to hand-write or hire a calligrapher to address your invitations. Avoid stick-on labels, as they are far too impersonal for such an important and special event.

Before mailing, take your entire invitation package to the post office and have it weighed and the postage calculated. You can also order the stamps you like if your post office doesn’t have them in stock.

Finally, once everything is reviewed, pop your invitations in the mailbox and let the rest of the planning continue!

Copyright © 2015 – Anna Post. Anna Post is the great-great-granddaughter of etiquette guru Emily Post and author of Emily Post’s Wedding Etiquette. For more information on sharing engagement news, check out, Emily Post’s Wedding Etiquette, 6th edition or visit www.EmilyPost.com.

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CelebrateIntimateWeddings

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Larry James is a non-denominational minister and performs the most “Romantic” wedding ceremony you will find anywhere! Every wedding ceremony is customized to your complete satisfaction. Call to check availability: Cell: 480-205-3694. You will find more than 475 pages of Wedding ideas, tips (90 tips and growing), ceremonies, and more at: http://www.celebrateintimateweddings.com. Check Larry’s availability.

comment2Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles, “LoveNotes” and wedding tips listed in this Wedding BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

Add Larry James to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
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Lots of Wedding Ideas on: Larry’s Pinterest Page

Saturday, January 24, 2015

Three Engagement Don’ts!

Anna Post, Guest Author

Holiday cheer often leads couples to start the New Year with the news, “We’re engaged!” Between Thanksgiving and New Year’s many people are sharing news of their engagement. Which leads to the first engagement don’t:

1. Don’t share your engagement news on social media before sharing it with your family.

WEDEngagmentsYou’re engaged, you’re so excited, and you can’t wait to tell everyone! The world of social media sometimes makes us forget the importance of face-to-face and verbal communication. But before you update your status for all to see, be sure to tell parents and children firs-ideally in person or over the phone if that is the only possibility. People want to hear the news directly from you!

Family, such as grandparents, and close friends can be hurt if they find out news of your engagement through something as impersonal as a group email or a Facebook post. So, tell the most important people first, and ask them in turn not to share the news until you’ve made all your personal announcements. Then, tweet and share away.

2. Avoid the rush to gush.

WeddingEtiquette

For more info, click the book cover!

It happens so quickly – you’re engaged one second, and the next, everyone is asking the date, the location, and the names of everyone in your wedding party. Despite your excitement, don’t get too caught up in the pressure to have all the answers.

Instead of sharing undecided plans or digging yourself into a hole by making promises you can’t keep, pause a moment and say, “It’s so early in our planning, we still have lots of things to decide!”

3. Don’t forget the big picture.

With sites like Pinterest full of beautiful wedding images it’s easy to be inspired by every tiny element of wedding planning. But it’s also easy to get lost in those details, even early on. Once you know your date and location, talk with your partner about your top big-picture priorities for the wedding; maybe food and music, or the invitation and flowers.

This will help you create your vision and keep the focus on what’s most important to the two of you as the decisions and expenses mount. And while you’re prioritizing your top elements of wedding planning, put the plans down from time to time and spend time together on the other interests you share.

Copyright © 2014 – Anna Post. Anna Post is the great-great-granddaughter of etiquette guru Emily Post and author of Emily Post’s Wedding Etiquette. For more information on sharing engagement news, check out, Emily Post’s Wedding Etiquette, 6th edition or visit www.EmilyPost.com.

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CelebrateIntimateWeddings

Click for Wedding Website!

Larry James is a non-denominational minister and performs the most “Romantic” wedding ceremony you will find anywhere! Every wedding ceremony is customized to your complete satisfaction. Call to check availability: Cell: 480-205-3694. You will find more than 475 pages of Wedding ideas, tips (90 tips and growing), ceremonies, and more at: http://www.celebrateintimateweddings.com. Check Larry’s availability.

comment2Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles, “LoveNotes” and wedding tips listed in this Wedding BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

Add Larry James to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Networking BLOG” at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com

Saturday, August 9, 2014

20 Table Etiquette Mistakes To Embarrass Yourself

Filed under: Etiquette,Manners,Wedding Tips — Larry James @ 8:30 am
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Lisa Stewart, Guest Author

So you think you can eat? Politely? If you’ve been spending too much alone time shoving food down your pie hole or hanging with friends whose careers don’t require adult behavior, your manners’ hard drive may be corrupted. It’s time to pull the napkin out of your collar and get serious again about good table manners.

Larry’s NOTE: Although this article was not necessarily written for weddings, it may shed some light on some special skills required when dining at a reception or at a fancy restaurant.

1. Don’t Rush the Table ~ A simple meal at a friend’s home is a great place to practice etiquette skills. Hopefully, you brought along an offering of wine, etc. and once there, are engaged in frivolity. But don’t get too comfortable too fast. Your hosts have some expectations. Let them lead the event including the gesture for seating. Musical chairs ended in grade school and it’s best to wait for their direction on when and where to sit. And naturally, ladies first.

DiningEtiquette2. Can you hear me now? ~ Thinking of putting your phone, keys, or purse on the table? This is a clutter free zone, not your kitchen counter. Pack away your muted devices after taking the requisite photos and doing the check in which should be no more than 30 seconds. It’s now considered acceptable to photograph your beautiful food or table mates if the host is doing it, otherwise, save the updates for later. Sara Rimer was dealing with this a few years ago and her advice is still timely.

3. Napkin Etiquette ~ It’s so much easier when the napkin is directly on your plate, otherwise panic sets in if you’re confronted with beautifully folded linens placed around the table. Yours is on the left which leaves your right hand free to use your eating utensil. Apologies to the lefties but this was decided long ago by royalty. Napkin History. Wait until your host is seated and takes his/her napkin. You may then proceed without great flourish… no snapping or flapping among the refined! Most cloth napkins are big enough for a half fold on your lap while paper napkins can be completely unfolded. A napkin is for keeping hands and face neat; any attempts at using it for a handkerchief will get you promptly moved to the kids’ table.

#44. Place Setting Cheat Code ~ Both hands in front of you now while making this symbol to the right. Look down. Do you see the letter “b” on your left? That stands for bread and that’s where your bread plate is located. The letter “d” is on your right and it means drink. No excuses now for scarfing down your neighbor’s bread and water as you’re in the know with this tricky cheat code.

5. Focus on etiquette, not plates ~ You’re seated without your technology which makes googling this puzzle impossible but don’t fear, the wait staff/hosts will guide you at this level. Napkin in place, the service begins and order replaces confusion. You’re the smart one now who recognizes that all the drinks will be offered to your right and your bread will be placed to your left. Soups or salads begin using the dish/bowl directly to your front and possibly on your entree plate. They’ve made it easy to find the appropriate utensils as they are placed on the outside to be used first. Notice the far left fork (salad) is shorter and wider so as to grab the greens more efficiently. The soup spoon to the far right is longer and wider to dip down into the bowl for every last drop. When getting that drop, you may tilt the bowl but don’t pick it up or even think about bringing it to your mouth!

When service of your entree begins, your used dishes and utensils will be removed (don’t forget to leave them on those dishes to signal that you’ve completed this course.)

The entree arrives which leaves the remaining utensils at the sides for your use. The smaller ones at the top of the entree plate are waiting for the final course which will be dessert.

Don’t even worry about the various water and wine glasses placed near you. The staff/host will offer and typically pour your beverage in the appropriate glass saving you the concern over which one to use. But in case you’re a worrier, the water glass and white wine glass are usually simple, tall and slim allowing these clear liquids to be highlighted . Short and wide wine glasses allow red wines to expand their surface while you have room at the top to breathe in their bouquet. Understanding the reasoning behind a shape or placement will help you remember its purpose.

6. Chew and listen. Swallow then talk. ~ Eating together is fulfilling. The breaking of bread in either a business setting or at home with friends and family touches something in our spirit. The ceremony of a meal is conducive to sharing and with that comes a multitude of etiquette mishaps. The most important (and perhaps most abused rule) is DO NOT EAT WITH YOUR MOUTH OPEN! It sounds simple but as we get excited sharing our conversation, we forget to chew and listen, swallow then talk. No matter what you are sharing, it gets lost as the audience watches the food in your mouth rather than listening to the content of your words.

7. Etiquette Food Sneaks ~ It seems so harmless at first. The hostess is speaking or saying grace at a large dinner and you think no one will notice that nibble of bread you’ve slipped into your mouth. People notice and make an internal judgment that you’re ill-mannered. You are welcome to sip your beverage but DO NOT start scarfing your meal if you should be listening to a speaker. Only when the speaker urges you to continue eating are you allowed to CONTINUE EATING!! Put your fork down but not on your plate (the wait staff sees that as a signal you’re done) and listen. Besides, your chewing is never louder than when you are the only one doing it at the table.

Click out the hilarious video below by GloZell to assault your senses if you think you can get away with being a Food Sneak!

8. Time to Make a Pass ~ It’s going so well and then you’re challenged to make a pass. Salt and pepper move as a set regardless of what is asked for…don’t separate these savory lovers when responding to a request. Also, it is acceptable to ask someone else to pass them if it’s still too far for you to reach. NEVER reach across a table!

Some will argue that it is rude to enhance the cook’s meal with salt and pepper. The cook/chef/host does not put condiments on the table unless they think you may want to add them to your food. It is very rare to find a home cook or restaurant chef’s table without condiments which means it’s completely appropriate. Asking for something unexpected to flavor your food though is a no-no and may get you a frosty glare if mentioned.

Eating family style? Passing of the bowls is entirely appropriate side to side. Do not extend bowls across the table. Also, the serving spoon/fork is an indication of portion size. Dole out ONE portion for yourself; if there is extra food after everyone has been served, it will be appropriate to ask for seconds.

9. Run for it ~ Your mother always said you couldn’t finish a meal without needing a bathroom break. If that’s still true OR you need to step away from the table for other reasons, do so without bringing much attention to yourself. The entire table does not need to know your business. Instead, excuse yourself quietly to those sitting nearest you, place your napkin ON your chair and quietly exit. Expect to be missed if you are absent for more than a few minutes and if so, expect to be quizzed by your table mates upon your return.

10. Conversation Etiquette ~ You converse everyday and it should be so simple but dinner conversation can be tricky if you’re with a business group, contentious friends, or dramatic family members. Alcohol, comfort level (because you feel so good about your etiquette) or being unfamiliar with your table mates can turn you into that person who causes cringes and rolled eyes. According to the Etiquette Scholar, it is key to Stop, Look, Listen, and Watch as you embark upon engaging your fellow diners. Stop talking if it isn’t well thought out, look at your listener’s expressions, listen as much as you talk, and watch whomever you are speaking with.

11. Hand Jive ~ Everything is going so well. You’re talking, eating, and drinking without fear of embarrassment until you notice someone watching your hands. Are you using the Caveman grip? There are two basic styles, Continental and American which are both acceptable. View Here Don’t make excuses for yourself if you’re not utilizing these. Regardless of your intellect and conversation skills, if you eat like the Flintstones, you’ll be treated like them.

12. Space… it’s personal ~ Personal space can be challenging at a crowded table which makes it even more important to follow acceptable boundaries. Keep your elbows tucked in when leveraging your utensils while cutting food and definitely DO NOT place them on the table until it has been cleared completely. Hands can be placed upon the lap when not eating or rested at the wrist on the edge of the table. Moving your chair too close to another can cause angst when either of you have to leave the table. Diners with mobility equipment should always be given preference to an end seat or the placement of their choosing for easy table access.

14. Don’t step in the etiquette land mine ~ How can we even be discussing this? Because it has happened too often! Dinner guests with all the right moves above the table get tripped up being too comfortable underneath the table. No matter how uncomfortable those new shoes are, DO NOT remove them under the table. Can there be anything more embarrassing then having to explain why you’re in bare feet when you rise to leave the table?

15. Polite Decline ~ With today’s myriad of food allergies, diet requirement, etc., it’s logical to communicate with your host pre-dinner concerning your needs. Most are happy to accommodate but mistakes can occur. Therefore, it’s your responsibility to respond amiably if your choices can’t be met. Restaurants can typically provide vegetarian fare but if you’re at someone’s home, show your class by letting the hostess know you’ll be doubling up on side items and bread. Making a scene about your inconvenience will get you on the “Do Not Invite” list for many.

If you have no reasonable requests but simply dislike the fare offered, put on your adult demeanor and make the effort to try a bit of everything. Taking obligatory bites and then slyly moving your food around your plate without eating it will go far in maintaining the respect of your host.

16. Utensil Morse Code ~ The restaurant servers or home hostess keep an eye on your utensil placement near the end of a course or your meal. They want the flow for everyone to be consistent so that conversation stays uninterrupted by a wholesale moving of dirty dishes. The simplest code is using your plate as a clock. Place your utensils parallel across your plate with the handles resting near four o’clock. A tip to remember: Your workday typically ends near four or five just as your meal is ending.

There are more specific details for formal dining. See the Etiquette Scholars for more information concerning these as well as International rules.

17. Let’s Share ~ Coffee and dessert? Maybe you’re feeling that you deserve a final treat after minding your manners. Private dinner parties will typically bring out the sweets now but at a restaurant, follow your host’s lead. If the hour is late, they may wave aside dessert but if everyone is ordering so can you.

Sharing desserts can be a pitfall for etiquette mistakes. At business gatherings, it is not even recommended. For hygiene purposes, once you and others have decided which dessert(s) to share, also request extra serving plates and utensils. You can then divide and conquer the sugary delight with everyone getting a bite and not sharing germs. But remember, you’ve asked the server to go above and beyond as you should for their tip when the bill comes.

18. Food isn’t free ~ The meal is coming to an end and if the bill is divided among the diners, there are a few points to remember:

a. Splitting a bill evenly should have been decided before the meal and the waiter informed.
b. Don’t penalize the non-drinkers; ask that beverages be charged separately.
c. For separate bills, remember that the wait staff has extra steps to keep it clear and should be rewarded with an extra tip.

Read more here about the touchy subject of Dividing the Bill

19. Giving thanks for no mistakes ~ A meal in which you have stretched your new found etiquette wings deserves a proper thank you. Although a text or email might be convenient, it’s the handwritten note that will get you noticed and invited to more wonderful gatherings. Networking isn’t just in the cyber world; it continues to be a personal experience. But, if your host has a strong online presence, be kind and thoughtful if you blog, FB, or tweet about your evening.

All of your well earned manners credit will be lost if you DO NOT send some form of thanks. Don’t delay or forget…that is the ultimate embarrassment.

20. Pay it forward and avoid embarrassment ~ Those beautiful flowers or nice wine that you brought to the dinner party…enjoy the feeling of getting your own. It’s one thing to be a polite and respectful guest who livens up the group and is often invited out, but how embarrassing for you if there is no reciprocation. If your living situation is not conducive to dinner parties, restaurants abound as well as other venues where you can host your own gathering. Museums, ballparks, theaters, can help you host your own dinner party. Be creative and adventurous and remember, there’s a whole new set of etiquette rules to conquer when you play host. Hostess with the Mostest.

LisaStewartCopyright 2014 – Lisa Stewart. Lisa is almost 50 and currently writing, modeling, adventuring and becoming enlightened. She was once a teacher, interior decorator, SAHM and trailing spouse for 23 years. Diagnosed with MS in 2006 and began a lifelong commitment to wellness and a stubborn streak to find “lifehacks” around her illness. So far, so wonderfully good… see her at www.afeatheryleaf.com

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Click for Larry’s Wedding Website!

Larry James is an award winning, non-denominational wedding officiant and performs the most “Romantic” wedding ceremony you will find anywhere! Every wedding ceremony is customized to your complete satisfaction. Call to check availability: 480-998-9411 or Cell: 480-205-3694. Pre-maritial relationship coaching is available and not required. You will find more than 475 pages of Wedding ideas, tips (90 tips and growing), ceremonies, and more at: http://www.celebrateintimateweddings.com. Something NEW about weddings is posted every 4th day on this Wedding BLOG. Check Larry’s availability.

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles, “LoveNotes” and wedding tips listed in this Wedding BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Networking BLOG” at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Authors & Speakers” BLOG at: http://AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.wordpress.com

Monday, August 29, 2011

What to Include (Etiquette Wise) With Your Wedding Invitations

Filed under: Etiquette,Invitations,Save the Date Cards,Wedding Tips — Larry James @ 7:00 am

First, you may want to send “Save-the-Date” cards. They are announcements that inform your guests of your future wedding in order for them to plan ahead for your wedding day. They are essential if any of your guests are traveling to your wedding, your wedding takes place on or around a holiday, you are planning a destination wedding, or your wedding will take place in a seasonally busy or tourist locale, where the flights and hotels perhaps book up early. They are generally sent at least 4-6 months prior to your wedding.

If you are planning a destination wedding, for example for an Arizona it is strongly recommended that you send them 12 months in advance if not longer. Because wedding guests want to dress appropriately for a destination wedding, it is important to include the dress code within the invitation as well. Read: “Getting Married in Arizona? Here’s the Latest Scoop!.”

Second, select a wedding invitation that reflects you both as a couple, and reflects the theme, tone and style of your wedding. You should send your wedding invitations 6 to 8 weeks in advance of the wedding date.

What can you include in your wedding invitation packages without stomping on wedding invitation etiquette? What is acceptable and what is not? Today many more things have become acceptable that were taboo not that long ago.

weddingresponsecardWith constantly evolving traditions and modern twists to the wedding, there are plenty of variations to wedding invitations. All of the information within them serves as the first form of communication between you and your guests. If you are having a traditional first-time wedding with all the bells and whistles, then you may want to add a little more than the basic information. If it’s going to be a more informal wedding or a second wedding with a not-so-traditional format, you may just want to list the basics.

Wedding Response Cards – Response cards, otherwise known as RSVP cards, helps ensure that your guest will respond to you if they are planning to attend. On these cards, guests tell whether or not they will be attending and how many will be attending. Include a response date and a stamped return envelope with your address pre-printed on the front.

Reception Card – Some modern couples hold the wedding ceremony and the reception in different places. While the wedding response card contains details about the ceremony event, the reception card specifies the address of the location, time, etc.

Directions and Maps – Be sure to include directions (with complete address and ZIP code) or a map with your invitation, especially if you are having out-of-town guests or planning a destination wedding. No photocopies, please. They should be printed in the same style as your invitations. If you are writing directions (e.g. from the airport, etc.) or developing a map, make sure you check and double check your facts before having them printed. A link to MapQuest or GoogleMaps might be helpful.

weddingmapHotel Accommodation Cards – A list of local hotels/guesthouses/Bed and Breakfasts for people needing to stay over. If the hotel is providing a special rate for guests at your wedding, make sure to mention it. Accommodation information cards are a good idea if you’re hosting your wedding at a vacation destination or if you have many out of town guests. They can include detailed travel information for your guests., including nearby airports, hotel options, area attractions and activities, rental car agencies, taxis, etc. If you have blocked a number of suites in a particular hotel you would provide this information on the accommodation card.

Web Sites – Some couples have websites where guests go to find information about the wedding. A simple card that provides the web address can be included within the invitations. Your wedding website can provide miscellaneous information that proper etiquette does not permit to be included in your wedding invitation. You can also provide details about the rehearsal dinner (for those in the wedding party), ceremony and reception and provide directions, hotel accommodations and rental car information.

Wedding Blog – Although a blog might be unusual, it’s an ongoing dialogue about your thoughts, feelings and ideas about your upcoming wedding. Invite comments and respond to guests. After the wedding you can post photos and video clips of your wedding.

properattireAn Attire Card – Guests sometimes wonder what to wear to a wedding. You can alert them by adding a line to the lower right corner of the invitation indicating “Black Tie,” “Casual,” or other information. If your wedding is outdoors you may want to ask them to wear “lawn-friendly shoes.” Guests coming from Minnesota to a November wedding in Arizona may want to know that the temperature will usually be between 70 and 80 degrees. Check out the Arizona temperatures. Click here.

Gift Registry – Even if the stores where you registered provides gift registry cards, DO NOT include the cards that contain information about your registry in your invitations. It’s impolite for you to start the conversation about gifts. According to traditional American etiquette, wedding gifts are purely optional. That’s why it’s uncouth to include any mention of gifts with your invitation – it comes across as if you are expecting a gift. Ask family, friends and the bridal party to spread the news when people ask; you can also put this information on your wedding website. Read: “Honeymoon Bridal Gift Registry.”

“Etiquette dictates that registry information should never be included in a wedding invitation, even though some stores provide printed cards for this purpose. Instead, rely on your family members and wedding party to spread the word. That said, it is generally acceptable for the hostess of a shower to include these details on that invitation (indeed, this is where you might put those information cards to use). And if people ask you directly where you’re registered, feel free to tell them. ~ Martha Stewart

Programs – Consider including a wedding ceremony program with your wedding invitation. It can both excite and comfort your guests to know about the schedule of events.

Reception Menu – Providing a menu for your guests before the reception might be great for those picky eaters, and get others drooling over the meal to come.

Your New Address Card – Since a change in marital status is often accompanied by a change of address, and sometimes a change of name, this small card is a way to let people know how to contact you after the wedding. Include the date you will return from your honeymoon, or your wedding date itself: “After August 31, 2011,” etc. Include your new address, cell phone, e-mail address, and website, if you wish to share them.

LovelandMDSpecial Postmarks for Wedding Invitations – Have cupid send your wedding invitations (or any other romantic card) to your friends and family that bears a postmark from Loveland, CO 80537. This city is one of several cities that have a special name whose postmark can embellish your wedding invitations with romance.

Miscellaneous Invitation Tips – Do not use abbreviations. Example: Spell out words such as Road, Street, and state names; Arizona (Not AZ). Four o’clock in the afternoon / Two Thousand Eleven. Tip: The “o” and “c” in “o’clock” are never capitalized. It is socially incorrect to mention “No Children Allowed.”

Copyright © 2011 – Larry James. This idea is adapted from Larry’s “romantic” Wedding Ceremony. Larry James is an award winning, non-denominational wedding officiant and performs the most “Romantic” wedding ceremony you will find anywhere! Every wedding ceremony is customized to your complete satisfaction. Call to check availability: 480-998-9411 or 800-725-9223. Pre-maritial relationship coaching is available and not required. You will find more than 460 pages of Wedding ideas, tips (90 tips and growing), ceremonies, and more at: http://www.celebrateintimateweddings.com. Something NEW about weddings is posted every 4th day on this Wedding BLOG. Check Larry’s availability.

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles, “LoveNotes” and wedding tips listed in this Wedding BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Networking BLOG” at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Authors & Speakers” BLOG at: http://AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.wordpress.com

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