Larry James' CelebrateIntimateWeddings BLOG

Friday, December 24, 2010

Tipping Your Wedding Vendors is a Common Courtesy

Filed under: Tipping Vendors,Wedding Tips — Larry James @ 7:00 am
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Other than the bride herself, it’s the wedding vendors that make a wedding truly beautiful and special. Wedding tips are commonly overlooked when couples set up their wedding budget. It is important to calculate as much as possible prior to your wedding how much you can afford to tip your wedding suppliers.

weddingtipRewarding vendors with a tip is expected, and it will serve as a thank-you for a job well done. My personal opinion is that you alone should decide how much to tip. When I tip, I pay no attention to the percentages that are often recommended by wedding consultants. I believe that you should tip based upon the quality of service, attention to detail and their overall extraordinary effort. Follow you heart. Don’t be stingy just to save a few bucks on your wedding!

In doing the research necessary for this article, I ran across more than one Website that suggested (with identical wording): “To tip a Minister/Officiant is to trivialize their profession and extremely bad etiquette.” Oh, really? Who started that one?

Note form Larry James: I object! 😉

If anyone deserves a generous gratuity, it’s the wedding Minister or Officiant – the one who makes your day special for you and your guests and whose job it is to make everything legal.

It has been my experience that it is rare to find anyone giving less than a $100 gratuity to the Minister/Officiant, and it could be more depending on the minister/officiant. Be sure to discuss the tip with your partner “before” the wedding. Please be sure to add this to your budget. All tips should be calculated and prepared in separate envelopes ahead of time, thereby making it much easier for the individual responsible to deliver the tips. A tip is an added reward for service well done. Tipping has always been a personal expression of gratitude for service given and appreciated. All tips should be given in cash.

Read your bills carefully to avoid double tipping. Tips are often included in the bill automatically. Some vendors, caterers for example, will include a gratuity in their price. Most usually the tips are given to the wedding consultant or the best man in sealed, labeled envelopes prior to the ceremony who will then discreetly give them to the various wedding vendors after the ceremony.

tippingIf your wedding is performed by a civil employee such as a judge, clerk, or other nonreligious official, then you may want to forgo a gratuity. Such civil employees are often paid a flat rate and are usually not permitted to accept tips or donations — local law may actually prohibit it.

largetipIf you belong to a church, your own minister or priest may perform the wedding at no charge. In this case, you could make a donation to the church ($500 is common), and as an extra thank-you, consider sending something personal, such as a gift certificate to a nice restaurant. Yes, it’s true. . . you don’t need to tip a wedding official but think of it this way: it’s good karma and a good way to start your marriage with a positive vibe from the one person who joined you as wife and husband.

IMPORTANT: Gratuities are always at your discretion and while they may be expected, poor service should never be excused nor should you extend a tip to those vendors who provide less than excellent service. If you get lousy service from a wedding vendor. . . say, “NO!” to a tip!

Copyright © 2010 – Larry James. This idea is adapted from Larry’s Wedding Website. Larry James is non-denominational, an award winning wedding officiant and performs the most “Romantic” wedding ceremony you will find anywhere! Every wedding ceremony is customized to your complete satisfaction. Call to check availability: 480-998-9411 or 800-725-9223. You will find more than 455 pages of Wedding ideas, tips (90 tips and growing), ceremonies, and more at: http://www.celebrateintimateweddings.com. Something NEW about weddings is posted every 4th day on this Wedding BLOG. Check Larry’s availability.

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles, “LoveNotes” and wedding tips listed in this Wedding BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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2 Comments »

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